Hovdala Castle

Defence tower

This castle may not be Swedens most beautiful one, but it has one of the most adventurous history in Sweden. During the Scanian wars between Denmark and Sweden during the 17th century the castle was attacked, burnt but also  sometimes defended with brilliance.

Today the castle belongs to the city of Hässleholm but from around 1680 till 1981, the Ehrenborg family owned the house and it’s sorroundings.

The first Ehrenborg was from Denmark and he was ennobled in Sweden 1687 and changed his name from Jens Mikkelsen to Jöns Ehrenborg. He let Swedish groups use his property during the Scanian wars and he was the owner of Hovdala when it fell in a battle 1678. He survived only because he hid in the defence tower for a day and a half before he sneaked out on a boat on the lake Finjasjon. During this age the castle had a mound around itself.

Hovdala castle

A more successful battle was 1612when Sivert Grubbe wasthe Danish Lord of the castle and Swedish groups attacked trying to defeat and burn the Manor. Grubbes men did a great job, they stood strong against two attacks from the Swedes who gave up and left.




Sivert Grubbe wrote in his dairy that years after when he travelled in Sweden he heard people talk about the attack and said it must have been the devil himself defending the castle. No matter how many times the Swedish soldiers hit the Scanian’s, they never fell! The bullets did not seem to do any harm.

And this was almost true.

Hovdala was understaffed so when Grubbe heard that the Swedish soldiers were on their way to attack them he and his crew took uniforms and stuffed them full with hay so they looked like soldiers and they put weapons in their “hands” and placed them carefully to fool the attackers that the castle was not understaffed.

And it worked. The Swedish soldiers were fooled by puppets!

/Per Skold

Variety of noble familys linked to the manor:

Ehrenborg

Grubbe (in Danish)

 

I only have a old videoclip from an old cellphone o show here, but it gives you an idea of the Mansion.

 

If you like to get a view of where this castle is situated, please subscribe with your e-mail address in the box up to the left (or below if you are on aphone/tablet), and you can download a pdf-map of Scania where these castles are pointed out. You will also get e-mails, about once per month, with more stories and links to only for subscribers videos about Swedish castles.

Trolleberg manor house

Trolleberg three floor manor
Trolleberg manor/Castle in Scania Sweden

Trolleberg manor house was besieged and burnt down in 1452 by the swedish King Karl Knutsson. The manor house is located at Hoje (Höje) river, at that point an important place where travellers could wade through the river.

Even if Knutsson destroyed the mansion he dis not do very well in the long run and the property went to the church.




In the 18th century the Trolle family (one of the oldest swedish/danish Noble familys) bought the house, and after several turns a son to a great great great
great father (could be more) is still today the owner of this noble house right by the southern city of Lund.

Watch the short videoclip Of the manor house. The mansion is privately owned and is not open for the public.

Variety of noble familys linked to the manor:

Thage Ottoson Thott

Peder Winstrup

Fredrik Trolle

(Sorry for a lot of Swedish links, but it is hard to find information in english)

If you like to get a view of where this castle is situated, please subscribe with your e-mail address in the box up to the left (or below if you are on aphone/tablet), and you can download a pdf-map of Scania where these castles are pointed out. You will also get e-mails, about once per month, with more stories and links to only for subscribers videos about Swedish castles.

/Per Sköld

Castles, manors and other noble houses in Scania-Sweden